Private Acts: Elections

Elections in Tennessee are now governed by the general statutes found in Tennessee Code Annotated title 2, chapters 1 through 19. Of particular interest to county officials is chapter 12, which covers the county election commission. The employment of administrator of elections and deputies by the county election commission is authorized by T.C.A. §2-12-201. Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 2-12-208 sets a minimum salary for certified administrators of elections based on a percentage of the assessor’s salary, and provides for certification tests, state contribution to each certified administrator’s salary and other budget requirements.

Title 3, chapter 1 of Tennessee Code Annotated reapportions the state into senatorial and representative districts for the general assembly. Tennessee Code Annotated §3-1-102 places Grainger County in the 4th state senatorial district (along with Claiborne, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson and Union counties), while T.C.A. §3-1-103 places it in the 35th representative district. Grainger County is part of the 4th U.S. congressional district, under the provisions of T.C.A. §2-16-103.

The following is a listing of acts for Grainger County which affected the elective process, but which have been superseded or repealed. They are listed here for historical and reference purposes.

  1. Acts of 1797, Chapter 10, authorized the citizens of Grainger County to hold elections for governor, members of the general assembly, and representatives to represent the state.
  2. Acts of 1798, Chapter 16, Section 3, apportioned four senators and eight representatives to the Hamilton District. Grainger County elected one senator and two representatives.
  3. Acts of 1799, Chapter 15, authorized the citizens of Clinch River, in Grainger County, to hold separate election for governor, members of the general assembly, and representatives to represent the state.
  4. Acts of 1803, Chapter 24, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The state was divided into five election districts with the counties of Grainger, Hawkins, Claiborne, Jefferson and Cocke composing the second electoral district and electing one elector.
  5. Acts of 1803, Chapter 51, authorized the citizens of parts of Claiborne and Anderson counties, which once were part of Grainger County, to hold separate elections.
  6. Acts of 1806, Chapter 23, authorized the citizens of Claiborne County who lived above the line which formerly divided the counties of Grainger and Hawkins to hold separate elections.
  7. Acts of 1812, Chapter 5, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The state was divided into eight election districts with the counties of Grainger, Sevier, Claiborne, Jefferson and Cocke composing the second electoral district and electing one elector.
  8. Acts of 1812, Chapter 27, divided the state into six congressional districts. The counties of Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne, Knox, Sevier Blount and Cocke composed the second congressional district and elected one representative to the United States Congress.
  9. Acts of 1812, Chapter 57, provided for the apportionment of senators in the state legislature. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell shall compose one election district and elected one senator.
  10. Acts of 1817, Chapter 129, authorized the sheriff of Grianger County to hold a separate election for the purpose of electing a governor, members to congress, electors to elect a president and vice president, members of the state legislature and militia officers.
  11. Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 5, laid off and established separate elections in the state. A precinct election was established at the house of Joseph Noah in Grainger County on the south side of the Holston River.
  12. Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 69, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, Grainger County elected one representative.
  13. Public Acts of 1822 (2nd Sess.), Chapter 1, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne, Cocke, Jefferson, Knox, Sevier and Blount composed the second congressional district.
  14. Public Acts of 1823, Chapter 47, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The second electoral district was composed of the counties of Grainger, Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Claiborne and Campbell.
  15. Public Acts of 1824, Chapter 1, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell composed the second electoral district and elected one elector.
  16. Public Acts of 1826, Chapter 3, divided the state into election districts for the purpose of electing senators and representatives. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson, Claiborne and Campbell composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, the counties of Hawkins, Washington, Greene, Jefferson, Grainger, Blount, Monroe and McMinn elected and returned one representative each.
  17. Private Acts of 1827, Chapter 197, established a precinct election in Grainger County.
  18. Public Acts of 1827, Chapter 17, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The second electoral district was composed of the counties of Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell and elected one elector.
  19. Private Acts of 1829-30, Chapter 174, Section 2, repealed Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 5, and moved the site of the precinct election to the Holston Paper Mill in Grainger County for the election of members to the legislature, governor and member to congress.
  20. Public Acts of 1832, Chapter 4, divided the state into districts for the election of
    representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger,
    Claiborne and Campbell composed the second congressional district.
  21. Public Acts of 1832, Chapter 9, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger and Claiborne composed the second electoral district.
  22. Public Acts of 1833, Chapter 4, established a precinct election at the house of Robert Huddleston in Grainger County.
  23. Public Acts of 1833, Chapter 71, divided the state into representative and senatorial districts under the enumeration of 1833. The counties of Grainger, Cocke, Jefferson and Claiborne composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, Grainger and Claiborne counties composed one election district and elected one representative.
  24. Public Acts of 1835-36, Chapter 39, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger and Claiborne composed the second electoral district.
  25. Acts of 1842 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 1, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson and Claiborne composed the fourth senatorial district in which the polls were compared at Rutledge in Grainger County. Furthermore, Grainger County elected one representative in which the poll was compared at the courthouse in Rutledge.
  26. Acts of 1842 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 7, divided the state into districts for the election of representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson, Claiborne, Campbell, Anderson, Morgan, Sevier, Blount and Moore composed the second congressional district.
  27. Acts of 1851-52, Chapter 196, divided the state into districts for the election of representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne, Campbell, Scott, Anderson, Knox, Morgan, Fentress and Overton composed the second congressional district.
  28. Acts of 1851-52, Chapter 197, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger County elected one representative and composed one senatorial district along with Claiborne, Anderson and Campbell counties.
  29. Public Acts of 1871, Chapter 146, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts.  Grainger and Hamblen counties jointly elected one representative and the counties of Grainger, Union, Anderson and Knox composed the fourth senatorial district
  30. Public Acts of 1873, Chapter 27, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Greene, Hawkins, Hancock, Claiborne, Grainger, Hamblen and Cocke composed the first congressional district.
  31. Public Acts of 1881 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 6, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger County elected one representative and was placed in the fourth senatorial district along with Claiborne, Union, Campbell and Scott counties.
  32. Public Acts of 1882 (2nd Sess.), Chapter 27, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Unicoi, Hawkins, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Claiborne, Cocke and Grainger composed the first congressional district.
  33. Public Acts of 1891 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 10, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger and Hamblen counties composed the second representative district while the third senatorial district was composed of Grainger, Hancock, Claiborne, Union and Campbell counties.
  34. Public Acts of 1891, Chapter 131, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Unicoi, Hawkins, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Claiborne, Cocke and Grainger composed the first congressional district.
  35. Public Acts of 1901, Chapter 109, divided the state into congressional districts. The first congressional district was composed of the counties of Sullivan, Johnson, Carter, Unicoi, Washington, Greene, Hawkins, Hancock, Claiborne, Grainger, Cocke and Sevier counties.
  36. Public Acts of 1901, Chapter 122, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The third senatorial district was composed of the counties of Grainger, Hancock, Claiborne, Union, Campbell and Scott. The fifth representative district was composed of Grainger and Hancock counties.
  37. Private Acts of 1947, Chapter 436, provided compensation for officers, judges, clerks and election officials holding general, regular or primary election in Grainger County in the amount of $2.00 per day.

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