Category: Geography & Topography

Progress on the Morristown & Cumberland Gap Railroad

By , May 15, 2011

A large force is now at work on the Morristown and Cumberland Gap railroad.

The track for sometime has been completed to the Holston river about five miles from Morristown. At this point a fine iron bridge is being erected and before many days will be completed.

At this end of the line from Corryton on the K C G & L railroad, the track has been laid two miles beyond the Lea Springs depot site and before many days the iron horse will be at Rutledge, the county seat of old Grainger, and from this point Bean’s Station, near Tate will soon be reached. In fact we are assured that the whole line will b completed and equipped within sixty days.

The people along the entire line are very much elated over the bright prospects and rapid progress. And the people of Knoxville will soon be in a position to go with ease and at pleasure to Lea Springs and Tate’s without change of cars. And this new and direct route to Morristown, through the beautiful valleys of Richland and Bean’s Station with the fine Clinch Mountain scenery will prove interesting and pleasing to the eye for a change.

When this important link is completed considerable travel will undoubtedly be secured from the Carolina’s via Cumberland Gap and Middlesborough to the west, also from the direct south in connection with the K C G & L railroad.

Knoxville Daily Journal — Tuesday, September 1, 1891

Transcribed by Robert McGinnis and used by permission.

Along the Morristown & Cumberland Gap Railroad

By , May 14, 2011

The soon to be completed Morristown & Cumberland Gap  railroad will provide a boom not only to the terminus at Morristown in Hamblen County, Tenn., but is small towns and hamlets along its route. The road will also provide a faster transportation to many of East Tennessee most famous watering holes.

Among the most prominent are those at Lea Spring in the lower end of Grainger county and Tate’s in the upper part of the county. The climate is exceedingly healthy and pleasant at all seasons of the year.

This important link after leaving Morristown crosses the Holston river at Shields Ferry about three and half miles from the city.

The first station or regular depot will be at the Woodson Taylor place, six miles distant and the next at Bean Station, one and half miles from Tates and ten from Morristown.

The third will undoubtedly be at the old Bowen farm, four and one half miles from Rutledge, the county seat.

The fourth at Joppa or Spring House, six miles south of Rutledge and the fifth at Lea Springs, which is about six miles above and halfway between Joppa and Carrolton, the termination of the road and only twenty-one miles from Knoxville and forty-four from Cumberland Gap.

The entire length of the M & C G R R from Morristown to Floyd or Carrolton, as it is now called, is forty miles and it is generally believed  will be in running order early in the spring.

There is more behind this important railroad link that on may now suppose. And as a valuable auxiliary to Morristown and East Tennessee in general, it will play beyond a question of a doubt a most useful part.

Knoxville Daily Journal — Thursday, July 10, 1890

Transcribed by Robert McGinnis and used by permission.

1836 Civil Districts

By , May 13, 2011

In 1836, by order of the Tennessee General Assembly, all Tennessee counties were divided into Civil Districts, which replaced Militia Companies for administration. The document below contains the detailed description of Grainger County’s Civil Districts.

Note: The text below was machine-converted from a printed transcription of the original, so errors are likely. Although this is a transcript of a transcript, we hope you will be able to locate your ancestors in a particular section of the county in the late 1830’s.

If you have corrections to this document, please contact the Webmistress.


In compliance with an Act of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee We James Salling, Thomas McBroom and William Clarke being a majority of the commissioners appointed by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee to lay off the County of Grainger into Districts. We therefore, having been duly sworn by Charles McAnally one of the Justices of the peace in and for the Said County do report and Say that we have laid off the Said County into fifteen Districts and that they are numbered and bounded as follows[:]

1st The line of the first District to begin at William Chainies [sic] at the Jefferson County line thence with the South Road to Holston River at Coffmans ford thence up the Said River to the Hawkins County line thence with the county line to the Corner thence with the Jefferson County line to the beginning the Election to be held at the papermill.

2nd The line of the Second District to begin at William Chainies [sic] at the Jefferson County line thence with the Said line to the panther Spring thence down panther Creek to Holston River thence up the said River to Coffmans ford thence with the South Road to the beginning the Election to be held at Maj. Joseph Noes.

3rd The line of the third District to begin at the mouth of Jacob Noe’s mill branch thence up the Said Branch to the head thence a direct course to the top of the big Ridge at the Little gap thence up the top of the big ridge to the Hawkins County line thence with the Said line to Holston River thence down the Said River to the beginning the Election to be held at David Counts’s.

4th The line of the fourth District to begin at the lower end of the Horse Shoe on Holston River thence with the horse Shoe Road to where it Intersects the Road leading from Mazes’s ford to Rutledge thence with the Said Road to Jesse Hodges thence a’ direct line to the top of the big Ridge So as to include John Daniel thence with the top of the big Ridge up to the Little gap thence a direct line to the head of Jacob Noe’s mill branch thence down the Said branch to Holston River thence down the said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Maze’s mill.

5th The line of the fifth District to begin at Combs’s ferry on Holston River thence with the Combs ferry Road to the top of the Richland Nobs thence up the Said Nobs against Jesse Hodges thence a direct line to the Road at Jesse Hodges thence with the Said Road to the lower end of the horse Shoe on Holston River thence down the Said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Dickson Smith’s.

6th The line of the Sixth District to begin at the mouth of Edward West’s Spring branch thence up the said branch to the head thence up the holler with Quillar Mitchel’s Spring branch thence a direct line to Thomas Davis’s so as to include the said Davis thence a direct line to the top of the Richland Nobs passing Joshua Hinchie’s thence up the top of the Richland Nobs to the Combs Ferry Road thence with the said Road to Holston River thence down the said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Thomas West’s Esqr.

7th The line of the Seventh District to begin at the mouth of Perrin’s mill branch thence up the Said branch and Perrin’s mill holler to the top of the Richland Nobs thence up the top of the Said Nobs to Joshua Hinchy’s so as to include the said Hinchy thence passing Thomas Davis thence with Quillar Mitchel’s Spring branch to Holston River thence down the Said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Evan Harris’s Old Place.

8th The line of the Eighth District to begin at the Knox County line on Holston River thence with the Said line to the Crooked Runn Nobs thence up the Said Nobs to Clinch mountain thence up the top of the Said mountain to the Road at Elkin’s gap thence down the falling-water branch to Richland Creek thence a direct line to the top of the Richland nobs thence a direct line to the head of Perrin’s mill holler So as to include the house where Robert Gains lived thence down the Said mill holler to Holston River thence down the Said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Plains Cross roades.

9th The line of the ninth District to begin on the top of the big Ridge at the Hawkins County line thence with the Said line to the top of Clinch mountain thence down the top of the said mountain against where Nicholas Counts, Senr., now lives thence a direct line to the top of the big ridge against the said Countses thence up the top of the big ridge to the beginning the Election to be held at Beans Station.

10th The line of the Tenth District to begin on the top of the big Ridge against where Nicholas Counts senr now lives thence a direct line to the top of Clinch mountain so as to include the Said Counts thence down the top of Clinch mountain to the Road at Atkins’s gap thence down the fall water branch to Richland Creek thence a direct line to the top of the Richland Nobs thence up the top of the Said nobs to the beginning the Election to be held at Col A Fulkerson’s.

11th The line of the Eleventh District to begin on Clinch River at the lower end of the Griffet old place thence a direct line to the top of Clinch mountain against Abner Dotsons so as to include Isaac Bullen, John Farrier, and the said Dotson thence up the top of Clinch mountain to the Hawkins County line thence with the said line to Clinch River thence down the said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Andrew McGinnis’s.

12th The line of the twelfth District to begin at the mouth of Adam Idols Spring branch on the Clinch River thence a direct line to Williams’s Creek at Odell’s mill so as to include the said Creek to Smith Stranges so as to include the said Strange thence with the Road passing Martin Cleveland’s to the Vally Road thence a direct line to the top of Clinch mountain against the said Cleveland’s thence up the top of the said mountain against Abner Dotson’s thence a direct line to the lower end of the Griffet Old place on Clinch River passing Abner Dotson, John Farmer’s, and Isaac Bullen’s thence down the said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Benjamin Lewis’s.

13th The line of the thirteenth District to begin at the mouth of Dotson’s Creek on Clinch River thence up the said Creek so as to include Joab Capps, David Yadin Junr on the top of Hinds’s Ridge thence a direct line to the Road passing above George W Vittitoes so as to include Joseph Smith thence with the said Road to the head of the branch passing down by the Widow Vittitoe’s thence down the said branch to Flat Creek thence a direct line to the top of Clinch Mountain against the Powder Spring Gap meeting house thence with the top of the said mountain up against Martin Cleveland’s thence with the Road passing the said Cleveland’s to Williams’s Creek at Smith Strange’s thence withe the said Creek to Odell’s mill thence a direct line to the mouth of Adam Idol’s spring branch on Clinch River thence down the said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Joseph Smith’s mill.

14th The line of the fourteenth District to begin on the top of the Comb ridge at the Knox County line thence with the Said line to the Crooked Runn Nobs thence up the top of the said Nobs to Clinch Mountain thence up the top of the said mountain against the Powder Spring Gap meeting house thence a direct line to the mouth of the branch passing the Widow Vittitoe’s so as to include Thomas Dennis thence up the said branch to the head thence with the road passing George W. Vittitoe’s so as to include the said Vittitoe thence a direct line to the top of Comb ridge against the said Vittitoe’s thence down the top of the said ridge to the beginning the Election to be held at Stephen Frost’s.

15th The line of the fifteenth District to begin at the Anderson County line on Clinch River thence with the said line and the Knox County line to the top of the Comb Ridge thence up the top of the said Ridge against Joseph Smith’s thence a direct line to Dotson’s Creek passing Joseph Smith’s, David Yadin Junr, and Joab Capps thence down the said creek to Clinch River thence down the said River to the beginning the Election to be held at Robert Huddleston’s.

Given under our hands this third day of February 1836

Jas Salling

Thos McBroom

W Clark

Commissioners

Topography of East Tennessee

By , May 13, 2011

Topographically considered, Tennessee presents eight natural divisions. These divisions are described as follows:

First, the Unaka division, including the extreme eastern portion of the State, and embracing a belt of country from Virginia to the Georgia line. It includes the greater portion of the counties of Johnson, Carter, Greene, Sevier, Blount, Monroe and Polk. The face of the country is exceedingly rough. Many of the mountain peaks rise to the altitude of from live to six thousand feet, and are on top entirely destitute of timber. The chains of mountain ridges are cut in numerous places by deep, rocky channels, through which the limpid mountain streams rush to the valley below. Nestling among these giant Unakas are many beautiful coves and valleys which afford homes for a contented and happy people.

Our second division having distinct topographical features is the Valley of East Tennessee. This division extends across the State from north to south, being limited on the east by the Unakas and on the west by the Cumberland Mountains. It is called a valley with reference to these mountain ranges, and, with outlying coves and valleys, embraces in whole or in part the following counties: Hancock, Hawkins, Grainger, Union, Jefferson, Knox, Roane, Meigs, Bradley, Hamblen, Carter, Johnson, Washington, Greene, Sevier, Cocke, Blount, Monroe, Polk, Claiborne, Anderson, Rhea, James, Hamilton, Bledsoe, Sequatchie and Marion.

This so-called Valley of East Tennessee is, in point of fact, a succession of narrow ridges and valleys, of greater or less width, trending from northeast to southwest. The ridges sometimes rise to the altitude of mountains. The valleys are traversed by beautiful streams, some of which are navigable and all of which afford abundant water-power. This division affords much valuable arable land which has been converted into beautiful farms, and which constitutes one of the best developed and most populous agricultural districts of the State.

——————

Source:  Hawkins, A. W., and Colton, Henry E., eds. Hand-book of Tennessee. Knoxville: Whig and Chronicle Steam Book and Job Printing Office (1882), pp.8-10.

Grainger County in 1882

By , May 13, 2011

County seat, Rutledge, having 126 inhabitants.  Other towns are, Tate Springs and Mineral Hill Springs, which are both noted summer resorts.

Navigable streams are the Holston and Clinch rivers, which afford water for flat boats. Besides these rivers there are a great number of creeks which furnish abundant water power.

The general surface of the county is made up of a number of flute-like valleys and ridges running from northeast to southwest.

The soil is generally good. There is great abundance of timber of many varieties, the oaks and pines predominating.

The mineral resources of Grainger county are undeveloped, though valuable minerals are believed to exist. The agricultural products are corn, wheat, oats and the various grasses, clover predominating among the grasses.

In the county there are a number of manufacturing establishments on a small scale.

The principal religious denominations are Methodists, Baptists and Dunkards.

County taxation on $100:  for schools 15 cents; for roads, 15 cents; for county purposes, 30 cents; special tax to pay indebtedness, 25 cents.

Source:  Hawkins, A. W., and Colton, Henry E., eds.  Hand-book of Tennessee.  Knoxville:  Whig and Chronicle Steam Book and Job Printing Office (1882), pg.  92.

Locales Identified in the GNIS

By , May 13, 2011

Populated Places that appear on topographic maps in the United States are listed in an online database maintained by the federal government’s United States Geological Survey and the U. S. Board on Geographic Names.

This entity is usually referred to as USGS. The database is called the Geographic Names Information System, or GNIS. Many genealogists use it frequently to find places, identify the county location, and determine the coordinates.

The following table contains all populated places in the GNIS identified as being within Grainger County. Places that no longer exist are identified with “(historical).”

The table also includes the latitude and longitude and name of the 7.5′ USGS topographical quadrangle map on which the place is shown. The place names in this table are clickable, taking you to the full entry in the GNIS database. Please note that this is not a comprehensive list of all communities and locales in the county. It is simply the government’s mapping system’s list. Click here to search GNIS for other topographical features or locations.

Populated Places

Place Name Latitude Longitude USGS 7.5′ Map
Agreeable (historical) 361130N 0833700W Joppa
Ambro (historical) 361539N 0833917W Powder Springs
Ashby (historical) 361734N 0834054W Powder Springs
Avondale 361809N 0832746W Avondale
Avondale Springs 361838N 0832745W Avondale
Bald Point 362440N 0832139W Swan Island
Bean Station 362037N 0831703W Bean Station
Beans 361953N 0832205W Bean Station
Beech Grove 362201N 0832811W Avondale
Beeler Mill 361927N 0833718W Dutch Valley
Big Q Estates 361600N 0832511W Avondale
Blaine 360915N 0834215W Luttrell
Boggs 361606N 0832340W Avondale
Bowen 361826N 0832543W Avondale
Buffalo Springs 361304N 0833347W Joppa
Cherokee 361226N 0832952W Talbott
Clear Springs (historical) 361729N 0833534W Dutch Valley
Clinch River (historical) 362141N 0833256W Dutch Valley
Crosby 361735N 0831711W Bean Station
Dotson 362008N 0832950W Avondale
Elm Springs 362010N 0833603W Dutch Valley
Fairview 362303N 0832133W Swan Island
Hammer Store 361449N 0833130W Joppa
Helton 361731N 0832359W Avondale
Highland Springs 361346N 0833834W Luttrell
Highlands (historical) 361330N 0833803W Luttrell
Holston (historical) 361607N 0831705W Bean Station
Hopper Bluff 361551N 0832345W Avondale
Idol 362200N 0832406W Avondale
Joppa 361415N 0833655W Joppa
Lake Forest Estates 361522N 0832505W Avondale
Lea Springs 361040N 0834100W Luttrell
Liberty Hill 361903N 0833652W Dutch Valley
Lulaville 361528N 0833432W Dutch Valley
Maples (historical) 361102N 0833945W Luttrell
Mary Chapel 361807N 0832128W Bean Station
Massengill Mill 361220N 0833322W Joppa
May Springs (historical) 361228N 0832745W Talbott
Meadow Branch 362125N 0831653W Bean Station
New Corinth 361206N 0833655W Joppa
Noeton (historical) 361758N 0832000W Bean Station
Oakland 361040N 0832930W Talbott
Oakman (historical) 362056N 0833338W Dutch Valley
Perrin Hollow 360847N 0833805W Luttrell
Powder Springs 361513N 0834011W Powder Springs
Puncheon Camp 361853N 0833221W Dutch Valley
Richland 360815N 0833956W Luttrell
Riverview 361712N 0832205W Bean Station
Rock Haven 362029N 0832314W Avondale
Rocky Summit (historical) 361720N 0831823W Bean Station
Rutledge 361651N 0833054W Dutch Valley
Shiloh 361210N 0832958W Talbott
Stithsville (historical) 361318N 0832657W Talbott
Sunset 361505N 0833500W Dutch Valley
Sycamore Spring 361405N 0833415W Joppa
Tampico 361147N 0833343W Joppa
Tate Springs 362024N 0832045W Bean Station
Thorn Hill 362130N 0832503W Avondale
Turley Mills (historical) 361548N 0832505W Avondale
Wa-Ni Village 361322N 0832716W Talbott
Washburn 361724N 0833528W Dutch Valley
Williams Springs 362014N 0833444W Dutch Valley
Wyatt Village 361920N 0831656W Bean Station

Census Districts

Name Latitude Longitude Elevation Quadrangle Map
Bean Station Division (historical) 362003N 0831931W 1276 Bean Station
Blaine Division (historical) 361519N 0833043W 1434 Dutch Valley
Rutledge Division (historical) 361014N 0833920W 1417 Luttrell
Thorn Hill Division (historical) 362239N 0832457W 1489 Howard Quarter
Washburn Division (historical) 361837N 0833634W 1220 Dutch Valley

Civil Divisions

Name Latitude Longitude Elevation Quadrangle Map
City of Bean Station 362019N 0831712W 1119 Bean Station
City of Blaine 360857N 0834144W 974 Luttrell
Commissioner District 1 361503N 0833110W 1335 Dutch Valley
Commissioner District 2 361801N 0832552W 1112 Avondale
Commissioner District 3 361038N 0833735W 1332 Luttrell
Commissioner District 4 361851N 0833540W 1306 Dutch Valley
Commissioner District 5 361845N 0831958W 1122 Bean Station
Grainger County 361600N 0832900W 1480 Avondale
State of Tennessee 354501N 0861501W 1066 Dillton
Town of Rutledge 361649N 0833111W 1001 Dutch Valley

Communities / Locales

Name Latitude Longitude Elevation Quadrangle Map
Beans 361920N 0832210W 1073 Bean Station
Black Fox 361910N 0834027W 1050 Powder Springs
Buffalo Springs State Hatchery 361235N 0833345W 1125 Joppa
Central Point 361517N 0832901W 1355 Avondale
Civilian Conservation Camp Number 27 (historical) 362237N 0832650W 1086 Howard Quarter
Civilian Conservation Corps Camp Number 8 (historical) 361240N 0833355W 1112 Joppa
Coffman Camp 362056N 0833109W 1043 Dutch Valley
Combs Cattle Farm 361306N 0833020W 1394 Joppa
Dutch 362106N 0833304W 1070 Dutch Valley
Fennel Store (historical) 360958N 0833700W 1070 Joppa
Finley Store (historical) 361300N 0833524W 1339 Joppa
German Creek Cabin Area 361731N 0832106W 1148 Bean Station
German Creek Dock 361815N 0832052W 1083 Bean Station
Gilmore Dock 361611N 0832327W 1086 Avondale
Grainger County Farm (historical) 361332N 0833205W 1115 Joppa
Greenlee Campground 361405N 0832604W 1106 Talbott
Henry Crossing 361606N 0833301W 961 Dutch Valley
Indian Cave 360933N 0833605W 902 Joppa
Indian Ridge 361007N 0833632W 1286 Joppa
Leffew Store (historical) 362350N 0832009W 1280 Swan Island
May Springs Campground 361255N 0832735W 1132 Talbott
Miller Store (historical) 361226N 0833711W 1358 Joppa
Narrow Valley 361618N 0832524W 1145 Avondale
Red House 361224N 0833924W 915 Luttrell
Roach Store (historical) 361140N 0833710W 1191 Joppa
Shirley Crossing 361538N 0833401W 971 Dutch Valley
Southern Dock 361546N 0832451W 1086 Avondale
Stones Mill (historical) 360846N 0833944W 889 Luttrell
Wa-Ni Boat Dock 361328N 0832650W 1076 Talbott

General Description of Grainger County

By , May 12, 2011

General Nature of the County

Grainger County is in the northeastern part of Tennessee.  It is bordered on the north by Claiborne and Hancock Counties, on the south by Hamblen and Jefferson Counties, on the east by Hawkins County, and on the west by Knox and Union Counties.  The U. S. Department of Economic and Community Development estimated the population of Grainger County to be 17,400 in 1988.

The county is irregular in shape, measuring about 28 miles from northeast to southwest and about 12
miles from north to south.  It has 193,700 acres, which consists of 181,500 acres of land and 12,200 acres of water.  The county is divided roughly into the northern and southern parts by Clinch Mountain and the Poor Valley Knobs, which extend across the county from northeast to southwest.

The county is in the Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys major land resource area.  The soils in this
area formed under forest vegetation and are dominantly light in color.  The soils in the Clinch Mountain and Poor Valley Knobs area are shallow to deep over sandstone or shale bedrock.  The soils in the rest of the county are shallow to very deep, dominantly over limestone or shale bedrock.

History

The area that is now known as Grainger County, between the Clinch and Holston Rivers, was originally
inhabited by the Cherokee Indians.  It was settled by whites about 1785. The first settlements were south of Clinch Mountain, at Bean Station in the Richland Valley, and north of Clinch Mountain, at the head of
Flat Creek.  These settlers were largely Scotch-Irish and German.

The North Carolina Legislature established Grainger County on April 22, 1796 (Holt and others, 1976). The county originally included parts of present-day Claiborne, Hamblen, Campbell, Union, and Hawkins Counties. From 1801 to 1870, Grainger County was reduced in size to its present borders.  In 1801, the county seat was established at Rutledge, in the central part of the county, and the first courthouse was erected. Bean Station, at the eastern edge of the county, bordering Hawkins County, is growing as more
people move into the Cherokee Lake communities nearby.

Natural Resources

Grainger County has an abundant supply of limestone.  Numerous limestone quarries that provide gravel and lime products are throughout the county.

The county has a good supply of fresh water.  Streams that flow throughout the year are common.  There are two large areas of impounded water — Cherokee and Norris Lakes.

Industry

Industry in Grainger County employs more than 1,800 people.  The major enterprises in the county
include textile, furniture, and mobile home manufacturing; trailer making; and metal working.

The housing industry has expanded slightly in recent years, keeping pace with a growing population
in some parts of the county.  Residential subdivisions are becoming more common all over the county.  Most of the residential units are single-family dwellings, but a few multiple-family residential complexes have been built.

Transportation Facilities

U.S. Highways 11W and 25E and State Highway 92 merge in Grainger County, providing ready access to
the surrounding counties and to the cities of Knoxville and Morristown.  Rutledge is 30 miles from access to Interstate 40.  Grainger County has a good network of local roads and streets.  Several roads in remote parts of the county are unpaved.  Several motor freight companies located in nearby cities serve the county.

The airport nearest to Rutledge is in Morristown.  It is a medium-intensity municipal airport.  The nearest
commercial air service is provided by Knoxville’s McGhee-Tyson Airport.

Climate

In winter, the average temperature is 38 degrees F, and the average daily minimum temperature is 27
degrees.  The lowest temperature on record, which occurred at Jefferson City on January 21, 1985, is -26
degrees.  In summer, the average temperature is 75 degrees and the average daily maximum temperature is 87 degrees.  The highest recorded temperature, which occurred on August 21, 1983, is 102 degrees.

The total annual precipitation is 39.65 inches.  Of this, about 21 inches, or more than 50 percent, usually
falls in April through September.  The growing season for most crops falls within this period. In 2 years out of 10, the rainfall in April through September is less than 18 inches.  The heaviest 1-day rainfall during the period of record was 4.82 inches at Jefferson City on May 7, 1984.  Thunderstorms occur on about 47 days each year.

The average seasonal snowfall is about 10.4 inches.  The greatest snow depth at any one time during the period of record was 7 inches.  On the average, 1 day of the year has at least 1 inch of snow on the ground.
The average relative humidity in midafternoon is about 60 percent.  Humidity is higher at night, and the
average at dawn is about 85 percent.  The sun shines 65 percent of the time possible in summer and 45
percent in winter.  The prevailing wind is from the northeast.  Average windspeed is highest, 9 miles per
hour, in spring.

Source:  http://soildatamart.nrcs.usda.gov/Manuscripts/TN057/0/tn_grainger.pdf

Private Acts: Highways & Roads

By , May 8, 2011

The following is a listing of acts which once had some effect upon the county road system
in Grainger County, but which are no longer operative. Also referenced below is an act which
repealed prior law without providing new substantive provisions.

  1. Private Acts of 1821, Chapter, 152, provided for the keeping in repair a part of a road leading from Bean’s Station in Grainger County to Kentucky that lies near Cumberland Gap on the Cumberland Mountain.
  2. Private Acts of 1825, Chapter 325, appointed William Clark of Grainger County and George Williams of Hawkins County as additional commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike.
  3. Private Acts of 1835-36, Chapter 147, appointed Thomas Whiteside of Grainger County as a commissioner of the Bean’s Station Turnpike Road.
  4. Acts of 1837-38, Chapter 45, appointed Nelson A. Senter of Grainger County as one of the commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike Road and outlined their duties and responsibilities.
  5. Acts of 1839-40, Chapter 92, provided that the next two commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike be from Grainger County.
  6. Acts of 1841-42, Chapter 190, appointed Charles McAnally and Hugh O. Taylor as commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike and outlined their duties and responsibilities.
  7. Acts of 1845-46, Chapter 139, authorized the commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike Road to use the proceeds from the tolls to pay for the turnpike’s repairs in Grainger County.
  8. Acts of 1847-48, Chapter 186, Section 7, authorized the building of a second toll in Grainger County for the Campbell and Anderson Turnpike Company.
  9. Acts of 1849-50, Chapter 176, Section 3, authorized the citizens of Claiborne and Grainger counties to pass on the Bean Station Turnpike Road free of charge.
  10. Acts of 1855-56, Chapter 36, repealed the law which had allowed the citizens of Grainger and Claiborne counties to pass the Bean Station Turnpike Road for free.
  11. Public Acts of 1875, Chapter 44, amended the various acts in reference to the Bean Station and Cumberland Gap Turnpike Roads as they affected Grainger County.
  12. Public Acts of 1879, Chapter 39, required that the toll of the Cumberland Gap Turnpike Road be leased out to the highest bidder whereupon the road was to be kept in good traveling order or the county court of Grainger County could terminate the lease.
  13. Private Acts of 1919, Chapter 378, regulated the working and laying out of public roads in Grainger County. This act was amended by Private Acts of 1935, Chapter 506, and Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 147, respectively.
  14. Private Acts of 1927, Chapter 443, provided for a system of good roads to regulate the laying out, working, changing, opening, closing and maintaining of public roads, culverts and ferries and bridges in Grainger County.
  15. Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 147, amended Private Acts of 1919, Chapter 378, by deleting sections 2 and 5.
  16. Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 366, created a road law for Grainger County, which provided for the election of road commissioners, their duties and salary; created three road districts and permitted the road commissioners to work the county convicts or prisoners upon the various roads of the county.
  17. Private Acts of 1939, Chapter 373, amended Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 366, by allowing women citizen to become candidates to serve as road commissioner and lowering the age of eligibility to 21 years. In addition to other changes, the act increased the salary of the chairman and vice chairman of the road commissioner to $300.
  18. Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, created a road law for Grainger County which included the election of a road superintendent, the fixing of his salary, bond, and manner of election, defined his duties, and prescribed his qualifications, fixed his term of office; permitted the road superintendent to work the county convicts or prisoners upon the various roads of Grainger County; and provided for the raising of funds for road purposes and the disbursement of the same in conjunction with all funds derived from the state or federal government.
  19. Private Acts of 1947, Chapter 94, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the road superintendent from $1,200 to $1,800.
  20. Private Acts of 1949, Chapter 820, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by eliminating the funds of the state gasoline tax to the road law.
  21. Private Acts of 1953, Chapter 208, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the road superintendent to $2,400 per annum.
  22. Private Acts of 1959, Chapter 60, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the secretary-bookkeeper to $100 per month.
  23. Private Acts of 1963, Chapter 188, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by authorizing $125 per month to the superintendent as reimbursement for his expenses in carrying out the duties of his office. In addition, this act further amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the secretary-bookkeeper to $150 per month.
  24. Private Acts of 1967-68, Chapter 105, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by providing $300 per month to the superintendent for the use of his car in conjunction with his duties as road superintendent. Furthermore, the salary of the bookkeeper was increased to $300 per month.
  25. Private Acts of 1967-68, Chapter 467, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by providing $200 per month to the superintendent for the use of his car in conjunction with his duties as road superintendent. Furthermore, the salary of the bookkeeper was decreased to $200 per month.
  26. Private Acts of 1974, Chapter 283, would have amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, but the act was not acted upon by local authorities prior to the publication of the 1974 Volume of Tennessee Private Acts.
  27. Private Acts of 1979, Chapter 111, repealed Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476 and all amendatory acts.

Private Acts: Highways/Roads — Road Law

By , May 8, 2011

Private Acts of 1929
Chapter 840

SECTION 1. That an Act entitled “An Act to provide for a system of good roads to regulate the laying out, working, changing, opening, closing and maintaining of public roads, culverts and ferries and bridges in the counties of this State having a population of not less than 13,360, nor more than 13,375, according to the Federal Census of 1920, or by any subsequent Federal Census; to create the office of ‘Superintendent of Roads,’ in such counties, and to define the powers and duties thereof and to provide for subordinate agents under same, to provide means, funds, labor, instrumentalities and powers for carrying into effect of said Act; to fix age limit of male citizens residing in such counties subject to road duty, to provide for payment of commutation to Trustee in lieu of work and provide fines and penalties for neglecting or refusing to work or commute to, making the Trustee Custodian of County road fund, to provide means of disbursing same, and to provide in the event that any part of this Act shall for any reason be held unconstitutional, for the remainder thereof,” being Chapter 443 of the Private Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee for the year 1927 passed April 14, 1927, and approved April 18, 1927, and being the Act set forth in the Caption hereof, be and the same hereby is repealed.

SECTION 2. That this Act take effect from and after the first of September, 1930, the public welfare requiring it.

Passed: April 11, 1929.

Private Acts: Elections

By , May 8, 2011

Elections in Tennessee are now governed by the general statutes found in Tennessee Code Annotated title 2, chapters 1 through 19. Of particular interest to county officials is chapter 12, which covers the county election commission. The employment of administrator of elections and deputies by the county election commission is authorized by T.C.A. §2-12-201. Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 2-12-208 sets a minimum salary for certified administrators of elections based on a percentage of the assessor’s salary, and provides for certification tests, state contribution to each certified administrator’s salary and other budget requirements.

Title 3, chapter 1 of Tennessee Code Annotated reapportions the state into senatorial and representative districts for the general assembly. Tennessee Code Annotated §3-1-102 places Grainger County in the 4th state senatorial district (along with Claiborne, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson and Union counties), while T.C.A. §3-1-103 places it in the 35th representative district. Grainger County is part of the 4th U.S. congressional district, under the provisions of T.C.A. §2-16-103.

The following is a listing of acts for Grainger County which affected the elective process, but which have been superseded or repealed. They are listed here for historical and reference purposes.

  1. Acts of 1797, Chapter 10, authorized the citizens of Grainger County to hold elections for governor, members of the general assembly, and representatives to represent the state.
  2. Acts of 1798, Chapter 16, Section 3, apportioned four senators and eight representatives to the Hamilton District. Grainger County elected one senator and two representatives.
  3. Acts of 1799, Chapter 15, authorized the citizens of Clinch River, in Grainger County, to hold separate election for governor, members of the general assembly, and representatives to represent the state.
  4. Acts of 1803, Chapter 24, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The state was divided into five election districts with the counties of Grainger, Hawkins, Claiborne, Jefferson and Cocke composing the second electoral district and electing one elector.
  5. Acts of 1803, Chapter 51, authorized the citizens of parts of Claiborne and Anderson counties, which once were part of Grainger County, to hold separate elections.
  6. Acts of 1806, Chapter 23, authorized the citizens of Claiborne County who lived above the line which formerly divided the counties of Grainger and Hawkins to hold separate elections.
  7. Acts of 1812, Chapter 5, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The state was divided into eight election districts with the counties of Grainger, Sevier, Claiborne, Jefferson and Cocke composing the second electoral district and electing one elector.
  8. Acts of 1812, Chapter 27, divided the state into six congressional districts. The counties of Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne, Knox, Sevier Blount and Cocke composed the second congressional district and elected one representative to the United States Congress.
  9. Acts of 1812, Chapter 57, provided for the apportionment of senators in the state legislature. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell shall compose one election district and elected one senator.
  10. Acts of 1817, Chapter 129, authorized the sheriff of Grianger County to hold a separate election for the purpose of electing a governor, members to congress, electors to elect a president and vice president, members of the state legislature and militia officers.
  11. Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 5, laid off and established separate elections in the state. A precinct election was established at the house of Joseph Noah in Grainger County on the south side of the Holston River.
  12. Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 69, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, Grainger County elected one representative.
  13. Public Acts of 1822 (2nd Sess.), Chapter 1, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne, Cocke, Jefferson, Knox, Sevier and Blount composed the second congressional district.
  14. Public Acts of 1823, Chapter 47, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The second electoral district was composed of the counties of Grainger, Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Claiborne and Campbell.
  15. Public Acts of 1824, Chapter 1, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell composed the second electoral district and elected one elector.
  16. Public Acts of 1826, Chapter 3, divided the state into election districts for the purpose of electing senators and representatives. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson, Claiborne and Campbell composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, the counties of Hawkins, Washington, Greene, Jefferson, Grainger, Blount, Monroe and McMinn elected and returned one representative each.
  17. Private Acts of 1827, Chapter 197, established a precinct election in Grainger County.
  18. Public Acts of 1827, Chapter 17, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The second electoral district was composed of the counties of Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell and elected one elector.
  19. Private Acts of 1829-30, Chapter 174, Section 2, repealed Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 5, and moved the site of the precinct election to the Holston Paper Mill in Grainger County for the election of members to the legislature, governor and member to congress.
  20. Public Acts of 1832, Chapter 4, divided the state into districts for the election of
    representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger,
    Claiborne and Campbell composed the second congressional district.
  21. Public Acts of 1832, Chapter 9, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger and Claiborne composed the second electoral district.
  22. Public Acts of 1833, Chapter 4, established a precinct election at the house of Robert Huddleston in Grainger County.
  23. Public Acts of 1833, Chapter 71, divided the state into representative and senatorial districts under the enumeration of 1833. The counties of Grainger, Cocke, Jefferson and Claiborne composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, Grainger and Claiborne counties composed one election district and elected one representative.
  24. Public Acts of 1835-36, Chapter 39, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger and Claiborne composed the second electoral district.
  25. Acts of 1842 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 1, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson and Claiborne composed the fourth senatorial district in which the polls were compared at Rutledge in Grainger County. Furthermore, Grainger County elected one representative in which the poll was compared at the courthouse in Rutledge.
  26. Acts of 1842 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 7, divided the state into districts for the election of representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson, Claiborne, Campbell, Anderson, Morgan, Sevier, Blount and Moore composed the second congressional district.
  27. Acts of 1851-52, Chapter 196, divided the state into districts for the election of representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne, Campbell, Scott, Anderson, Knox, Morgan, Fentress and Overton composed the second congressional district.
  28. Acts of 1851-52, Chapter 197, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger County elected one representative and composed one senatorial district along with Claiborne, Anderson and Campbell counties.
  29. Public Acts of 1871, Chapter 146, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts.  Grainger and Hamblen counties jointly elected one representative and the counties of Grainger, Union, Anderson and Knox composed the fourth senatorial district
  30. Public Acts of 1873, Chapter 27, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Greene, Hawkins, Hancock, Claiborne, Grainger, Hamblen and Cocke composed the first congressional district.
  31. Public Acts of 1881 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 6, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger County elected one representative and was placed in the fourth senatorial district along with Claiborne, Union, Campbell and Scott counties.
  32. Public Acts of 1882 (2nd Sess.), Chapter 27, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Unicoi, Hawkins, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Claiborne, Cocke and Grainger composed the first congressional district.
  33. Public Acts of 1891 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 10, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger and Hamblen counties composed the second representative district while the third senatorial district was composed of Grainger, Hancock, Claiborne, Union and Campbell counties.
  34. Public Acts of 1891, Chapter 131, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Unicoi, Hawkins, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Claiborne, Cocke and Grainger composed the first congressional district.
  35. Public Acts of 1901, Chapter 109, divided the state into congressional districts. The first congressional district was composed of the counties of Sullivan, Johnson, Carter, Unicoi, Washington, Greene, Hawkins, Hancock, Claiborne, Grainger, Cocke and Sevier counties.
  36. Public Acts of 1901, Chapter 122, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The third senatorial district was composed of the counties of Grainger, Hancock, Claiborne, Union, Campbell and Scott. The fifth representative district was composed of Grainger and Hancock counties.
  37. Private Acts of 1947, Chapter 436, provided compensation for officers, judges, clerks and election officials holding general, regular or primary election in Grainger County in the amount of $2.00 per day.

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