Category: Miscellaneous

Law Enforcement — Offenses — Firearms

By , May 8, 2011

Private Acts of  1961
Chapter 312

SECTION 1. That this Act prohibits the use of Firearms for hunting on Sundays in Counties having a population of not more than Twelve Thousand, Five Hundred Fifteen (12,515) and not less than Twelve Thousand, Five Hundred (12,500) according to the Federal Census of 1960 or any subsequent Federal Census. It is hereby declared to be a misdemeanor for any person to use Firearms of any nature for the purpose of hunting on Sundays.

SECTION 2. That upon conviction of any person for the use of Firearms on Sundays contrary to the provisions of this Act he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined not less than Ten Dollars ($10.00) nor more than Fifty Dollars ($50.00).

SECTION 3. That the provisions hereof shall have no effect until approved by a two-thirds (b) vote of the Quarterly County Court of counties hereby affected at a regular meeting of said County Court occurring more than thirty (30) days subsequent to the approval of this Act by the Chief Executive of the State. Its approval or non-approval shall be proclaimed by the presiding Officer of said Quarterly County Court and the action of the Quarterly County Court thereon shall be certified by him to the Secretary of State, at Nashville.

SECTION 4. That this Act shall take effect from and after its passage, the public welfare requiring it.

Passed: March 15, 1961.

Private Acts: Highways & Roads

By , May 8, 2011

The following is a listing of acts which once had some effect upon the county road system
in Grainger County, but which are no longer operative. Also referenced below is an act which
repealed prior law without providing new substantive provisions.

  1. Private Acts of 1821, Chapter, 152, provided for the keeping in repair a part of a road leading from Bean’s Station in Grainger County to Kentucky that lies near Cumberland Gap on the Cumberland Mountain.
  2. Private Acts of 1825, Chapter 325, appointed William Clark of Grainger County and George Williams of Hawkins County as additional commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike.
  3. Private Acts of 1835-36, Chapter 147, appointed Thomas Whiteside of Grainger County as a commissioner of the Bean’s Station Turnpike Road.
  4. Acts of 1837-38, Chapter 45, appointed Nelson A. Senter of Grainger County as one of the commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike Road and outlined their duties and responsibilities.
  5. Acts of 1839-40, Chapter 92, provided that the next two commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike be from Grainger County.
  6. Acts of 1841-42, Chapter 190, appointed Charles McAnally and Hugh O. Taylor as commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike and outlined their duties and responsibilities.
  7. Acts of 1845-46, Chapter 139, authorized the commissioners of the Bean’s Station Turnpike Road to use the proceeds from the tolls to pay for the turnpike’s repairs in Grainger County.
  8. Acts of 1847-48, Chapter 186, Section 7, authorized the building of a second toll in Grainger County for the Campbell and Anderson Turnpike Company.
  9. Acts of 1849-50, Chapter 176, Section 3, authorized the citizens of Claiborne and Grainger counties to pass on the Bean Station Turnpike Road free of charge.
  10. Acts of 1855-56, Chapter 36, repealed the law which had allowed the citizens of Grainger and Claiborne counties to pass the Bean Station Turnpike Road for free.
  11. Public Acts of 1875, Chapter 44, amended the various acts in reference to the Bean Station and Cumberland Gap Turnpike Roads as they affected Grainger County.
  12. Public Acts of 1879, Chapter 39, required that the toll of the Cumberland Gap Turnpike Road be leased out to the highest bidder whereupon the road was to be kept in good traveling order or the county court of Grainger County could terminate the lease.
  13. Private Acts of 1919, Chapter 378, regulated the working and laying out of public roads in Grainger County. This act was amended by Private Acts of 1935, Chapter 506, and Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 147, respectively.
  14. Private Acts of 1927, Chapter 443, provided for a system of good roads to regulate the laying out, working, changing, opening, closing and maintaining of public roads, culverts and ferries and bridges in Grainger County.
  15. Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 147, amended Private Acts of 1919, Chapter 378, by deleting sections 2 and 5.
  16. Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 366, created a road law for Grainger County, which provided for the election of road commissioners, their duties and salary; created three road districts and permitted the road commissioners to work the county convicts or prisoners upon the various roads of the county.
  17. Private Acts of 1939, Chapter 373, amended Private Acts of 1937, Chapter 366, by allowing women citizen to become candidates to serve as road commissioner and lowering the age of eligibility to 21 years. In addition to other changes, the act increased the salary of the chairman and vice chairman of the road commissioner to $300.
  18. Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, created a road law for Grainger County which included the election of a road superintendent, the fixing of his salary, bond, and manner of election, defined his duties, and prescribed his qualifications, fixed his term of office; permitted the road superintendent to work the county convicts or prisoners upon the various roads of Grainger County; and provided for the raising of funds for road purposes and the disbursement of the same in conjunction with all funds derived from the state or federal government.
  19. Private Acts of 1947, Chapter 94, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the road superintendent from $1,200 to $1,800.
  20. Private Acts of 1949, Chapter 820, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by eliminating the funds of the state gasoline tax to the road law.
  21. Private Acts of 1953, Chapter 208, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the road superintendent to $2,400 per annum.
  22. Private Acts of 1959, Chapter 60, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the secretary-bookkeeper to $100 per month.
  23. Private Acts of 1963, Chapter 188, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by authorizing $125 per month to the superintendent as reimbursement for his expenses in carrying out the duties of his office. In addition, this act further amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by increasing the salary of the secretary-bookkeeper to $150 per month.
  24. Private Acts of 1967-68, Chapter 105, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by providing $300 per month to the superintendent for the use of his car in conjunction with his duties as road superintendent. Furthermore, the salary of the bookkeeper was increased to $300 per month.
  25. Private Acts of 1967-68, Chapter 467, amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, by providing $200 per month to the superintendent for the use of his car in conjunction with his duties as road superintendent. Furthermore, the salary of the bookkeeper was decreased to $200 per month.
  26. Private Acts of 1974, Chapter 283, would have amended Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476, but the act was not acted upon by local authorities prior to the publication of the 1974 Volume of Tennessee Private Acts.
  27. Private Acts of 1979, Chapter 111, repealed Private Acts of 1945, Chapter 476 and all amendatory acts.

Private Acts: Elections

By , May 8, 2011

Elections in Tennessee are now governed by the general statutes found in Tennessee Code Annotated title 2, chapters 1 through 19. Of particular interest to county officials is chapter 12, which covers the county election commission. The employment of administrator of elections and deputies by the county election commission is authorized by T.C.A. §2-12-201. Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 2-12-208 sets a minimum salary for certified administrators of elections based on a percentage of the assessor’s salary, and provides for certification tests, state contribution to each certified administrator’s salary and other budget requirements.

Title 3, chapter 1 of Tennessee Code Annotated reapportions the state into senatorial and representative districts for the general assembly. Tennessee Code Annotated §3-1-102 places Grainger County in the 4th state senatorial district (along with Claiborne, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson and Union counties), while T.C.A. §3-1-103 places it in the 35th representative district. Grainger County is part of the 4th U.S. congressional district, under the provisions of T.C.A. §2-16-103.

The following is a listing of acts for Grainger County which affected the elective process, but which have been superseded or repealed. They are listed here for historical and reference purposes.

  1. Acts of 1797, Chapter 10, authorized the citizens of Grainger County to hold elections for governor, members of the general assembly, and representatives to represent the state.
  2. Acts of 1798, Chapter 16, Section 3, apportioned four senators and eight representatives to the Hamilton District. Grainger County elected one senator and two representatives.
  3. Acts of 1799, Chapter 15, authorized the citizens of Clinch River, in Grainger County, to hold separate election for governor, members of the general assembly, and representatives to represent the state.
  4. Acts of 1803, Chapter 24, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The state was divided into five election districts with the counties of Grainger, Hawkins, Claiborne, Jefferson and Cocke composing the second electoral district and electing one elector.
  5. Acts of 1803, Chapter 51, authorized the citizens of parts of Claiborne and Anderson counties, which once were part of Grainger County, to hold separate elections.
  6. Acts of 1806, Chapter 23, authorized the citizens of Claiborne County who lived above the line which formerly divided the counties of Grainger and Hawkins to hold separate elections.
  7. Acts of 1812, Chapter 5, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The state was divided into eight election districts with the counties of Grainger, Sevier, Claiborne, Jefferson and Cocke composing the second electoral district and electing one elector.
  8. Acts of 1812, Chapter 27, divided the state into six congressional districts. The counties of Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne, Knox, Sevier Blount and Cocke composed the second congressional district and elected one representative to the United States Congress.
  9. Acts of 1812, Chapter 57, provided for the apportionment of senators in the state legislature. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell shall compose one election district and elected one senator.
  10. Acts of 1817, Chapter 129, authorized the sheriff of Grianger County to hold a separate election for the purpose of electing a governor, members to congress, electors to elect a president and vice president, members of the state legislature and militia officers.
  11. Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 5, laid off and established separate elections in the state. A precinct election was established at the house of Joseph Noah in Grainger County on the south side of the Holston River.
  12. Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 69, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, Grainger County elected one representative.
  13. Public Acts of 1822 (2nd Sess.), Chapter 1, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne, Cocke, Jefferson, Knox, Sevier and Blount composed the second congressional district.
  14. Public Acts of 1823, Chapter 47, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The second electoral district was composed of the counties of Grainger, Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Claiborne and Campbell.
  15. Public Acts of 1824, Chapter 1, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell composed the second electoral district and elected one elector.
  16. Public Acts of 1826, Chapter 3, divided the state into election districts for the purpose of electing senators and representatives. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson, Claiborne and Campbell composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, the counties of Hawkins, Washington, Greene, Jefferson, Grainger, Blount, Monroe and McMinn elected and returned one representative each.
  17. Private Acts of 1827, Chapter 197, established a precinct election in Grainger County.
  18. Public Acts of 1827, Chapter 17, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The second electoral district was composed of the counties of Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell and elected one elector.
  19. Private Acts of 1829-30, Chapter 174, Section 2, repealed Public Acts of 1819, Chapter 5, and moved the site of the precinct election to the Holston Paper Mill in Grainger County for the election of members to the legislature, governor and member to congress.
  20. Public Acts of 1832, Chapter 4, divided the state into districts for the election of
    representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger,
    Claiborne and Campbell composed the second congressional district.
  21. Public Acts of 1832, Chapter 9, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger and Claiborne composed the second electoral district.
  22. Public Acts of 1833, Chapter 4, established a precinct election at the house of Robert Huddleston in Grainger County.
  23. Public Acts of 1833, Chapter 71, divided the state into representative and senatorial districts under the enumeration of 1833. The counties of Grainger, Cocke, Jefferson and Claiborne composed one election district and elected one senator. In addition, Grainger and Claiborne counties composed one election district and elected one representative.
  24. Public Acts of 1835-36, Chapter 39, provided for the election of electors of president and vice president of the United States. The counties of Sullivan, Hawkins, Grainger and Claiborne composed the second electoral district.
  25. Acts of 1842 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 1, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson and Claiborne composed the fourth senatorial district in which the polls were compared at Rutledge in Grainger County. Furthermore, Grainger County elected one representative in which the poll was compared at the courthouse in Rutledge.
  26. Acts of 1842 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 7, divided the state into districts for the election of representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Grainger, Jefferson, Claiborne, Campbell, Anderson, Morgan, Sevier, Blount and Moore composed the second congressional district.
  27. Acts of 1851-52, Chapter 196, divided the state into districts for the election of representatives to the United States Congress. The counties of Grainger, Claiborne, Campbell, Scott, Anderson, Knox, Morgan, Fentress and Overton composed the second congressional district.
  28. Acts of 1851-52, Chapter 197, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger County elected one representative and composed one senatorial district along with Claiborne, Anderson and Campbell counties.
  29. Public Acts of 1871, Chapter 146, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts.  Grainger and Hamblen counties jointly elected one representative and the counties of Grainger, Union, Anderson and Knox composed the fourth senatorial district
  30. Public Acts of 1873, Chapter 27, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Greene, Hawkins, Hancock, Claiborne, Grainger, Hamblen and Cocke composed the first congressional district.
  31. Public Acts of 1881 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 6, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger County elected one representative and was placed in the fourth senatorial district along with Claiborne, Union, Campbell and Scott counties.
  32. Public Acts of 1882 (2nd Sess.), Chapter 27, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Unicoi, Hawkins, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Claiborne, Cocke and Grainger composed the first congressional district.
  33. Public Acts of 1891 (Ex. Sess.), Chapter 10, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. Grainger and Hamblen counties composed the second representative district while the third senatorial district was composed of Grainger, Hancock, Claiborne, Union and Campbell counties.
  34. Public Acts of 1891, Chapter 131, divided the state into congressional districts. The counties of Johnson, Carter, Sullivan, Washington, Unicoi, Hawkins, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Claiborne, Cocke and Grainger composed the first congressional district.
  35. Public Acts of 1901, Chapter 109, divided the state into congressional districts. The first congressional district was composed of the counties of Sullivan, Johnson, Carter, Unicoi, Washington, Greene, Hawkins, Hancock, Claiborne, Grainger, Cocke and Sevier counties.
  36. Public Acts of 1901, Chapter 122, divided the state into senatorial and representative districts. The third senatorial district was composed of the counties of Grainger, Hancock, Claiborne, Union, Campbell and Scott. The fifth representative district was composed of Grainger and Hancock counties.
  37. Private Acts of 1947, Chapter 436, provided compensation for officers, judges, clerks and election officials holding general, regular or primary election in Grainger County in the amount of $2.00 per day.

Private Acts: Elections — Districts — Reapportionment

By , May 8, 2011

Maps and legal descriptions of the boundaries of the county commissioner districts may be found in one of the following offices: county clerk, county election commission, state coordinator of elections, secretary of state, and the division of local government, office of the comptroller of the treasury.

Civil districts by that name are no longer used as district boundaries for election of legislative body members. These civil district boundaries have been left undisturbed as they existed prior to the first reapportionment of the quarterly county courts for real property record-keeping purposes only. T.C.A. §5-1-112.

The acts listed below have affected the civil districts in Grainger County, but are no longer operative regarding elections.

  1. Acts of 1907, Chapter 170, created a special school district in the fifth civil district of Grainger County.
  2. Private Acts of 1911, Chapter 129, created the sixth and seventh civil districts for Grainger County and detached a part of the fourth civil district and attached it to the fifth civil district.
  3. Private Acts of 1913, Chapter 215, changed the line between the second civil district and the third civil district of Grainger County.

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